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Modeling a Twisted Ribbon

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Arunvigneshram View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Arunvigneshram Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Modeling a Twisted Ribbon
    Posted: 06.Oct.2018 at 19:32
Can someone give me a general idea on how to model the twisted ribbon as shown in the image below?

Cheers!
Arun Vignesh
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philippe JOSEPH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philippe JOSEPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06.Oct.2018 at 20:34
Hello Arun, your ribbon is very special, what is it in the real life ?
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Arunvigneshram View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Arunvigneshram Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06.Oct.2018 at 21:03
Hello Philippe Joseph, thanks for your reply. Yes this ribbon is metal piece inserted into a pipe to change melting and solidifying properties of a Phase Changing Material that I'm studying. I have other types of inserts which were easy enough but I'm struggling a bit with modelling this one. This was already modelled by someone whose information I can't access, So I'm just curious on how they would have modelled this. I can think of a few long complicated ways of doing this,but I want to see if there's any elegant way of modelling this without going into too much trouble which will lead to many confusions and complications.
Cheers!
Arun Vignesh
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philippe JOSEPH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philippe JOSEPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06.Oct.2018 at 21:45
Hello again, for the ribbon in itself I would use the LOFT command between 2 rectangles correctly located in 3D and then do some material removal with the command SUBTRACT for the notches.
With the command LOFT the ribbon will be with facets I think and I'm wondering if the command SWEEP along an helix can be applyable here for a smoothed result ( or only for surfaces and not solids ) because I don't have AutoCAD here at home; I would only try it monday morning. 

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Kent Cooper View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kent Cooper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12.Oct.2018 at 16:30
You can get a SURFACE shaped like that with LOFT between two concentric HELIXes:
 
 
The red edges are the Helixes; the grey Surface in between is the result of LOFTing between them.  That has no thickness, though -- I'm not sure how to turn it into a SOLID with some actual thickness, from which you could SUBTRACT something for the notches.
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philippe JOSEPH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philippe JOSEPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12.Oct.2018 at 19:01
Hello Kent, in fact I have not finished it but I'm building a ribbon with an extruded rectangle along an helix path or more precisely the union of 2 rectangles along 2 helixes. 
I have to verify by "playing" with the parameters of the result in the properties palette ( Ctrl+1 ).
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Kent Cooper View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kent Cooper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12.Oct.2018 at 19:08
Originally posted by philippe JOSEPH philippe JOSEPH wrote:

... I would use the LOFT command between 2 rectangles correctly located in 3D ....
 
Not between just 2 of them, but an approach that worked for me was to draw a long skinny rectangle, copy it upward multiple times, rotate each copy successively more to create the twist, and then LOFT through the stack of them.  I did them at a distance apart about the same as the length of the rectangle, and at 30-degree successive rotations -- I don't know how large the angle can be and still work right, but 90-degree rotation gave a very different kind of result.
 
That gives a real Solid, rather than a Surface as in my previous reply.  What I haven't found a good way to do yet is to position little Solids appropriately for Subtracting to make the notches -- ARRAYPATH seems likely, but I haven't found the right combination of options and initial orientation to get them to align in the right way.
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philippe JOSEPH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philippe JOSEPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12.Oct.2018 at 19:44
Or maybe we are going to loose our mind because Arunvigneshram is just teasing us with his Solidworks ans we are working with AutoCAD and not Inventor or an other product.

Edited by philippe JOSEPH - 12.Oct.2018 at 20:02
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SEANT View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SEANT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13.Oct.2018 at 10:58
A sequence of commands:
Helix
Loft
Sweep
Subtract
Thicken

Results.


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philippe JOSEPH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philippe JOSEPH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13.Oct.2018 at 11:05
Seant you are number "ONE", tell us more !!!!!!!!!!!!
Eventually a "step by step" drawing ?
I suppose that LOFT is like Kent's method : LOFT between 2 concentric helixes, and then ...
I suppose that THICKEN is what Kent what waiting for or his next step. 


Edited by philippe JOSEPH - 13.Oct.2018 at 11:07
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